Author Topic: Co-Working: REPLICATION IN AN TRADITIONAL OFFICE  (Read 2290 times)

Maliha Islam

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Co-Working: REPLICATION IN AN TRADITIONAL OFFICE
« on: December 31, 2018, 06:09:35 PM »
Co-Working: REPLICATION IN AN TRADITIONAL OFFICE

Once large organizations buy-into a new trend, their logical progression is to internalize the practice. Are we going to see Facility Managers and workplace strategists creating co-working spaces within their own workspaces?  The most important success factor will be the ability to replicate the culture of coworking spaces.

What shared spaces allow for is true freedom and mobility. The culture is conducive to the truly organic collaboration and conversations that are struck up. In one way this is the value of coworking spaces. They allow for innovation by allowing different people with unique skills and talents to connect and collaborate.

But the other advantage is the fact that the culture is shaped out of the concept of freedom and flexibility. The genesis of coworking spaces was based around serving the needs of small organizations and freelancers to connect. Design is only one aspect though. What makes coworking spaces different is culture. Some organizations may have similar spaces in their office but not have a culture that encourages flexibility to get up and move or collaborate with different departments.

One effective strategy to combat this barrier is to bring the culture to you. A Michigan based organization, Menlo Innovations did exactly this when they added 7,000 sq.ft. of coworking space to their office and invited start-ups and entrepreneurs to work alongside their team. This is a win-win if logistics can be worked out. Start-ups are able to get affordable and flexible space, while larger organizations are able to foster innovation in their workplaces.

COWORKING CONTINUES TO GROW




The freelance economy is growing. Younger members of the workforce, such as Millennials or Gen Z are increasingly finding themselves in freelance work. Currently there are 53 million freelancers in the US. By the time we reach 2020, 50% of the American workforce will consist of freelancers (both full and part-time).This in turn will give rise to more coworking spaces.

Additionally coworking spaces are effective for small organizations that range from a one to several employees and also serve a purpose for larger organizations looking to innovate.

The design and culture serves as an example for any organization looking to come up with fresh ideas and grow. It’s no wonder we have heard a lot of buzz about these spaces in the last couple of years. You can definitely expect to hear more and see more of these types of spaces popping up near you. Our advice? Get Involved!

Source: https://www.chargespot.com/workspaces/coworking-spaces/